Racism No Longer Exists

Racism doesn’t exist.

At least it didn’t in my little world as a child. Even today I try to stay in my little bubble but sometimes it’s not so easy.

I grew up in a small agricultural community called McFarland where the population was primarily Hispanic. Since Mexicans were the majority, to us racism was something we joked about because we didn’t really know what it was.
When you grow up with people who are the same, shop at the same places, go to the same churches, know the same people, you thrive in the differences. Differences excite you. Racism is something you read about, not something you experience.

We’d say the gabachos (white kids) were the minority, not us. This was, of course, while not fully understanding just exactly what a “minority” was. To me it meant, “less in quantity.”
Unfortunatley, experience has led me to the actual definition of what minority truly means, the definition, I’ve learned can mean different things to different cultures, in some cases it can even mean, “lesser than.”
It could mean a group of people you dont want to belong to, someone you dont want to be.

When you’re a minority you get treated a tad bit different. Sometimes it’s not by much. It’s hardly noticeable. Other times it’s so blatant that it’s insulting.

Like the time I took my kids to the craft store, Color Me Mine. I was ignored while the white lady with her matching jumpsuit and Dooney and Bourke bag was getting the Royal treatment.
Was it because of the way I looked?

It happened at the Marketplace where most of the women walking around are Barbie replicas. Did I not look like I belonged with my 5ft, 135 lbs, brown hair, brown eyes, in my $5.99 Susie’s Deal’s outfit? Did I not get treated right because I wasn’t wearing $200 jeans? Or because my kids weren’t wearing Gap?

Or was it because I am Mexican?

I always try to shrug it off as, “Oh, she just had a bad day.” Or “They just have bad customer service skills. I’m sure they are like that with everyone.” When somebody tries to tell me it’s because I’m Mexican, I try to explain to them they are wrong. Times have changed and there’s no such thing as racism.

When my son was in the 8th grade he and a few friends stayed the night at another friend’s house after a school dance. The next morning he tells me that around midnight they decided to walk to the store to get some fried burritos from a mini mart.

As they were walking they got stopped by the police. They were told to sit on the sidewalk and were asked one by one for their names. They were breaking curfew, but other than that, they weren’t doing anything illegal.

My son was really insulted at the way he was treated but I tried to explain to him that it was justified. Even though they weren’t doing anything wrong they were BREAKING CURFEW!

He says that the cop asked each of them their first names and age. When the cop got to my son he asked him to stand up. He took a picture of him to keep in his files and he asked him for his full name and address. He also asked him what they were doing out and a few other questions. My son complied. My Little Mexican With His Water Polo Team, showing spirit at a high school football game.

 
My Little Mexican With His Water Polo Team, showing spirit at a high school football game.

They were driven back to his friend’s house, where they talked to the parents. Everything checked out so the kids were released to them.

My son was confused as to why out of all six kids that were with him, he was the only treated like a hoodlum and questioned like a common criminal. He just couldn’t understand why he was treated so rudely while his friends were treated so courteously.

He said he thought it was because he was the only Mexican in the group.

“There is no such thing as racism anymore. That’s a thing of the past,” I found myself explaing to my thirteen year old son. “Maybe it was just that you looked like you were up to something, while they didn’t.”

Sometimes it’s much easier to try to convince him and others than it is to convince myself.

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7 responses to “Racism No Longer Exists

  1. Wow… that is so insulting. I still have to experience this. I am Chilean, so I guess someday it may happen to me. I am so sorry that you and your son had to endure this, it is infuriating…

  2. The thing is, maybe it didn’t happen to me becuase I’m Mexican? That’s still up for debate, you know? Maybe it happened because the lady was just a bitch. LOL

    Maybe the cop decided my son looked the most honest? Or the one that had the most to hide?

    It’s all so subjective.

  3. I’m so sorry Twixie…your post is beautiful, and beautifully written..but the content…argh…racism will always be around us, I wonder why, and I fear it, but I know it exists. Perhaps it’ll change and it’ll be classism or xenophobia..maybe it will stop being about colour, but people tend to segregate and differentiate socially…it sucks. It really does. What’s more, I’m very excited about my trip to the states, but I’m also terribly afraid of being discriminated against for being South American.

  4. It’s hard not to believe the worst when all of the best explanations always leave us as the ones picked out of a crowd.

  5. “Sometimes it’s much easier to try to convince him and others than it is to convince myself.”

    This is such a powerful post… unfortunately, after living in Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Washington DC, I know all too well that racism DOES exist, in all sorts of ways. But I do believe a day will come when it does not.

  6. Everyone experiences discrimination at one time or another and it always sucks. And it’s not always about race or ethnic origin but those types of groups do unfortunately tend to experience it more often than others. I really admire how you are teaching your son to deal with this in such a powerful and dignified way. I hope he is able to follow your excellent example.

    My husband’s father and 8 siblings moved to the US from Mexico a long time ago and they all taught their kids to deal with prejudice by trying to understand the different reasons for it.

    It really sucks that this continues to be necessary, but I guess it is one of the unfortunate aspects of human nature.
    Maybe one day when we all become more evolved, people will care more about other things. I certainly hope so.

  7. I agree. I’ve actually had comments from white (to keep it simple) friends that say they’ve been discriminated against by minorities as well. It goes both ways, I guess. I only know what I’ve experienced, therefore can only blog about what I know.

    I agree with you that it’s human nature. If it weren’t color, it’d be social status, etc. It’s always something, right? 🙂

    Thanks for the comment!

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